Year 5's Red-back 1998
Year 5's Spiders 2000
Year 5's Spiders 2001
Common Spiders Aus
Common Spiders USA
Australian Spiders -
Red-back
Australian Spiders -
Funnel-web
Other Spiders
Wandering Spider
Recluse bite photos
Another Arachnid
Spider First Aid
Famous Spider Poems
Our Spider Poems
Viewers' Spider Poems
Spider Songs
Spider Stories
Spider Letters
Spider Art
Kids' Spider Homes
Chocolate Spiders
Cookie Spiders
Spider Lessons
Online Exercises
Spider Food Hunt
Guest Book -Sign
Guest Book -View
Spider Links
Spider Awards
Main Page
Email Us
 

You are viewer number:

 

These pages are maintained and created by Glenda Crew.

Spider Photos - Lynx Spiders

Here's some photos of Lynx spiders, sent in by Barb from the USA. Many thanks for allowing us to use the photos sent in. All photos are copyright to their owners and may not be reproduced without permission. Please choose a section.

Unidentified Spiders 2005 Unidentified Spiders 2004 (1) Unidentified Spiders 2004 (2)
Unidentified Spiders 2003 Unidentified Spiders 2002 Unidentified Spiders 2001
Spiders in Amber Closeups Jumping Spiders
Argiopes/St. Andrew's Cross Garden Orb Weavers Golden Orb Weavers
Marbled Orbweavers Redback/Black Widow Huntsman Spiders
Jewelled Spiders Mygalomorphs Lynx Spiders
Crab Spiders Wolf Spiders Brown Recluse Spiders
Fishing Spiders Southern House Spider Miscellaneous Spiders

LYNX SPIDERS

Green Lynx Spider (Peucetia viridans)
Lynx spiders get their name from the way that they sometimes pounce on their prey in a catlike fashion. These spiders spend their time hunting for insects in bushes and low plants. They are fast runners, but can occasionally be seen lying in wait for prey beside flowers. They build no web for prey capture, but they do release a silk dragline as they hunt among leaves.
Look For: Bright green, cream, or tan body; legs are yellow with black spines.
Length: 5/8".
Habitat: Fields, woods.

Range: Southern U.S.
Bite: While the Green Lynx spider aggressively attacks its insect prey, it very seldom bites humans.
..
29 October, 2004:
Hi. My name is Jennifer Hand and I teach biology at Cairo High School in Cairo, GA. I noticed this spider (green lynx) in our outdoor classroom and took these pictures. I thought you could use it for your site. The female spider is guarding the young, but I was curious about some of the other spider remains. I thought maybe it was the remains of the male, but I am beginning to think it is a molted exoskeleton of the female. Do the females eat the male after mating? My class and I are curious...so could you help us out? Thanks, Jennifer

..

28 October, 2004:
I'm not sure how to upload to your site other than this. I just thought this pic turned out very well. I've been watching this spider before it even laid its eggs. Now they are hatched, and the mother is sucking on a bee. Taken in Rancho Bernardo, Southern California 10/26/04. Hope you like...
-Dan Kuffrey

Click for a larger view.

 

..
15 October, 2004:
I'm sending you my best spider pics from the last couple months. Thought you might like to have them for your image library, maybe display a couple in the "known" spider pages. I'm getting better at capturing close-ups. One of these days I'll get a real good shot of that Jumper. Until then... Keep up the good work, I love your site! Cheers, Terry Lucas
Lakewood, Ca.
Click photo for some lovely close ups.

..

5 October, 2004:
I am embarrased to admit that I have been searching online for this particular spider for a while now. I came across your site and was pleased. I was wondering if anyone could identify this? I live in Gainesville, GA. I found it in our butterfly bushes with its egg sack and I'm assuming its a female. Please help me out. Thank you for your time.

Click for a closer view
 

..
5 September, 2004:
Greets Glen,
Here's a couple shots of a green Lynx spider I took this morning. He likes to sit on the Salvia and wait for moths and bees and the like, and jumps and grabs them. He's fast, real fast. Anyways, Love the site, Thanks.
Cheers,
TL (So. Cal.)

Click for a larger view.

..

29 August, 2004
I found this Spider in my garage located in Flower Mound, Texas, a suburb north of Dallas, Texas. Can you tell me what type of spider it is? Best Regards, Raymond Grubbs
cpbsolutions@comcast.net
Reply: Looks like a lynx spider.

..
16 June, 2003:
Bee ware! Green lynx spider with honey bee.
barb

..

16 June, 2003:
This is a nice shot of a Green Lynx spider (Peucetia viridans) with a flower bee. You can see her egg sac in the background. The small bumps on the sac are spiderlings. This animal was very depleted and thin, due in part I think to her selected location, which was mostly in the shade all day. Another female lynx had an egg sac in a pine tree which was in a sunny spot, and she was quite robust in comparison.

Green Lynx spiders are unique in that the females have been observed spitting venom to protect their eggs. I stayed out of spitting range!

barb

..

16 June, 2003:
This is the Green Lynx spider who nested in the pine tree. As you can see, she is much more robust than the other spider who lived in the  shaded part of the yard. Her egg sac is visible below. She wove some of the pine needles together behind it, and the hatchlings took shelter in  it after leaving the egg sac.
barb

../font>

16 June, 2003:
This is a young Green Lynx spider on a Nigella flower.
This is probably the offspring of the Pine Tree lynx of last winter, as it's only a couple of meters away from the pine tree.

barb

../font>

Here's a really worthwhile site to help support the kids in Africa who are suffering in the AIDS epidemic. Click on the banner for more info.>

Want to list your Brisbane/SE Qld based business or organisation's web page? Click here to find out how.